The story of zeus in leda and the swan by william butler yeats

According to Greek myth, Leda was the mother of mankind.

The story of zeus in leda and the swan by william butler yeats

The swan completes the act, and Leda becomes pregnant. She will give birth to Helen of Troy, the woman over whom the Trojan War will be fought. In Ancient Greek mythology – and in Yeast's poem – Leda's rape is taken as an indirect a cause of war. Leda and the Swan is a story and subject in art from Greek mythology in which the god Zeus, in the form of a swan, seduces Leda. According to later Greek mythology, Leda bore Helen and Polydeuces, children of Zeus, while at the same time bearing Castor and Clytemnestra, children of her husband Tyndareus, the King of Sparta. Leda and the Swan was written in , a year of success for alphabetnyc.com, who was awarded the Nobel prize for Literature. The poem is a Petrarchan sonnet, a form usually associated with love and romance, yet here used controversially by Yeats. The story of Leda .

Yeats, who was awarded the Nobel prize for Literature. The poem is a Petrarchan sonnet, a form usually associated with love and romance, yet here used controversially by Yeats. The story of Leda and the Swan comes from ancient Greek mythology.

She later the same night lay with her human husband Tyndareus, and so produced eggs out of which hatched four individuals - Castor and Pollux the twins and the half-sisters Helen and Clytemnestra.

The story of zeus in leda and the swan by william butler yeats

Yeats took the central theme of this story - the seduction, the rape - and turned it into a metaphor for the British involvement in Ireland, which lasted centuries, eventually coming to a conclusion in At least, this is one interpretation of Leda and the Swan. Others see it as a disguised narrative of the progress of western civilisation.

A single violent event sets off a cycle of barbarism and deceit, initiating the modern era and despite the pessimism and outrage, positive and beautiful things can emerge. But as Yeats himself said ' Bird and lady took such possession of the scene that all politics went out of it.

After meeting with and listening to Ezra Pound, the young American poet and editor, Yeats became more aware of his poetic language and developed a more concise way of saying things. But he never lost his interest in folklore and mythology and went on using them as vehicles for more contemporary ideas - Leda and the Swan proves that.

Leda and the Swan - Petrarchan Sonnet Form Leda and the Swan is a Petrarchan sonnet with a rhyme scheme of abab cdcd efg efg and has 14 lines one of which is split, so officially it has 15 lines and is mostly iambic pentameter in rhythm. That is, it has five stresses in each line, a steady rhythm which does occasionally alter to reflect the violent action.

All the end rhymes are full, for example: Yeats chose the sonnet form, traditionally associated with romance and love, to highlight the irony - this is a full blown rape, a controversial subject for the tightly knit framework of a sonnet. After eight lines comes the volta or turn, where the previous lines are answered or a conclusion is drawn.

Look out for the unusual way in which the poet ends the sonnet. Leda and the Swan Leda and the Swan Analysis of Leda and the Swan Leda and the Swan is based on the well known ancient Greek myth in which Zeus takes the form of a swan in order to make love to Leda, wife of Tyndareus, King of Sparta, who also happens to lay with her that very night.

She becomes pregnant and the following births of Helen, Clytemnestra, Castor and Pollux all have profound effects on the history of Greece and subsequently, western civilization. Yeats used this theme of seduction, rape and resultant offspring as a metaphor for the relationship between Britain and Ireland.

Britain being the swan the mighty Zeus and Ireland Leda the helpless victim.

Leda and the Swan by William Butler Yeats: Critical Appreciation

Perhaps this is why the poet uses such dramatic language in the first eight lines of the poem. From the opening three words the reader is instantly caught up in this act, this shocking scenario of violent passion. It is nothing short of a rude assault. The diction is worth focusing on: There is a natural tension set up as the poem progresses; it is basically a masculine versus feminine struggle.

In Greek mythology the gods looked down on the human world and treated them as playthings. Humans were pawns in a game.

Every so often the gods would enter the human world and stir things up. In this poem it is the brutal physical act that sets off a chain of events, divinely inspired it could be said, leading to all sorts of disruption and violence in human society. Further Line by Line Analysis of Leda and the Swan Lines 1 - 4 Set right in the here and now, this sonnet opens with an astonishing scene of violence, passion and trauma.

This is no ordinary sonnet on the theme of sweet romance and eternal love. The reader is right there in the front row, staring at what is a blatant sexual assault on a girl, the wife of a king no less.

Leda and the Swan Summary

The first line has five stresses, iambic and spondaic, to reflect the impact of the swan as it impregnates Leda, who is in shock, staggers back, and is helpless to resist. Note the use of enjambment - where one line flows into another without punctuation and with the sense maintained - and caesura, the pause in the middle of the line as the physical act takes place.

Rhythm is all important, as is the tension between the stresses and the content. Alliteration is strong in the fourth line:A summary of a classic Yeats poem ‘Leda and the Swan’ (published in ) is one of W. B.

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Leda and the Swan - Petrarchan Sonnet Form The poem, which somewhat unusually for Yeats is a sonnet, is about the rape of the Greek girl Leda by the god Zeus, who has assumed the form of a swan.
Analysis of Poem "Leda And The Swan" By alphabetnyc.com | Owlcation He spent his childhood in County Sligo, where his parents were raised, and in London.

Yeats’s most widely anthologised poems. The poem, which somewhat unusually for Yeats is a sonnet, is about the rape of the Greek girl Leda by the god Zeus, who has assumed the form of a swan. Yeats's Leda and the Swan is a sonnet based on Greek mythology, and one in which he interprets the rape of queen Leda by god Zeus as an incident of annunciation of a two thousand years' long phase of civilizational cycle in history.

Born in Dublin, Ireland, on June 13, , William Butler Yeats was the son of a well-known Irish painter, John Butler Yeats.

He spent his childhood in County Sligo, where his parents were raised, and in London. Leda and the Swan Summary. The poem, Leda and the Swan by William Butler Yeats, talks about the story of the Greek mythology, the Copulation of Zeus (or Jupiter) and Leda.

The poet narrates the story vividly, dramatically, and with almost a . William Butler Yeats's "Leda and the Swan" retells the story from Greek mythology of the rape of a girl named Leda by Zeus, the most powerful of the Greek gods. The "twist" of the story is that Zeus is disguised as a swan.

Yeats presents this tale in a relatively graphic way, so modern readers may find the language disturbing. Leda and the Swan is a story and subject in art from Greek mythology in which the god Zeus, in the form of a swan, seduces Leda.

According to later Greek mythology, Leda bore Helen and Polydeuces, children of Zeus, while at the same time bearing Castor and Clytemnestra, children of her husband Tyndareus, the King of Sparta.

Leda and the Swan by William Butler Yeats - alphabetnyc.com